My Child

Director: Can Candan
Turkey, 2012, 82’

Benim Çocuğum takes us in to five different households in Turkey. We listen to lesbian, gay, bisexual and trans kids stories from their parents point of view. All the stories have denial, trauma, helplessness, fear, shame, acceptance and rebirth themes in common. While a mother worries that her kid is going to be hurt, the other one remembers the first bra she bought for her trans daughter. A grandmother asks “Is this from God?” and she is ready to accept what is from God. These parents that accepted their kids as they are in a transphobic and homophobic society, redefine being an activist while sharing their experiences. The documentary that takes its power from the parents love is a simple and sincere expression of the most powerful resistance against homophobia and transphobia.

Kosmos

Kosmos

My Child

My Child

Haute Tension

Haute Tension

Staterror

Staterror

Close-Up

Close-Up

Generation Z

Generation Z

Shorts from Turkey

Shorts from Turkey

In A Galaxy Far Far Away

In A Galaxy Far Far Away

Queer Shorts

Queer Shorts

Where are they now?

Where are they now?

Trailer

My Child

At the Order of the Padishah

At the Order of the Padishah

In this piece, Żmurko presents an exotic image of a harem chamber, replete with gleaming fabrics and scattered jewels, as a setting for the statuesquely beautiful body of an odalisque murdered “at the order of the padishah”. 

Bosphorus at the Orientalist Paintings

Bosphorus at the Orientalist Paintings

The Bosphorus, which divides the city from north to south, separates two continents, renders Istanbul distinct for western painters, offers the most picturesque spectacles for western artists.

Jean-Michel Basquiat Look At Me!

Jean-Michel Basquiat Look At Me!

The exhibition “Look At Me! Portraits and Other Fictions from the ”la Caixa” Contemporary Art Collection” examined portraiture, one of the oldest artistic genres, through a significant number of works of our times. Paintings, photographs, sculptures and videos shaped a labyrinth of gazes that invite spectators to reflect themselves in the social mirror of portraits.