Hasret: Sehnsucht

  • March 17, 2024 / 15:00
  • March 27, 2024 / 19:00

Director: Ben Hopkins
Participants: Ben Hopkins, İsa Çelik, Bilge Güler, Serhat Saymadi
Germany, Türkiye, 2015, 82', DCP, color
Turkish, German, English with Turkish, English subtitles

A German television channel sends a small production team to Istanbul for a documentary project. As soon as the team arrives in Istanbul, they visit different neighborhoods and interview fascinating characters. While editing, the documentary's director encounters mysterious figures and shadows that they hadn't noticed during filming. This mystery leads the director to become obsessed with ghosts, compelling the team to film in deserted and dark places where ghosts might be more visible.

As the character's journey progresses from the present to the past, from light to darkness, the landscape of Istanbul also transforms. Neighborhoods changed by urban transformation, demolitions, undocumented migrant workers, and residents from different religions and sects all bring to the surface the unique, deep sorrow of Istanbul.

Transit

Transit

Lost in Translation

Lost in Translation

Oslo, August 31st

Oslo, August 31st

Stray Dogs

Stray Dogs

Hasret: Sehnsucht

Hasret: Sehnsucht

Good News from the Skies

Good News from the Skies

Inspired by the exhibition And Now the Good News, which focusing on the relationship between mass media and art, we prepared horoscope readings based on the chapters of the exhibition. Using the popular astrological language inspired by the effects of the movements of celestial bodies on people, these readings with references to the works in the exhibition make fictional future predictions inspired by the horoscope columns that we read in the newspapers with the desire to receive good news about our day. 

Il Cavallo di Leonardo

Il Cavallo di Leonardo

In 1493, exactly 500 years ago, Leonardo da Vinci was finishing the preparations for casting the equestrian monument (4 times life size), which Ludovico il Moro, Duke of Milan commissioned in memory of his father some 12 years earlier. 

The Ottoman Way of Serving Coffee

The Ottoman Way of Serving Coffee

Coffee was served with much splendor at the harems of the Ottoman palace and mansions. First, sweets (usually jam) was served on silverware, followed by coffee serving. The coffee jug would be placed in a sitil (brazier), which had three chains on its sides for carrying, had cinders in the middle, and was made of tombac, silver or brass. The sitil had a satin or silk cover embroidered with silver thread, tinsel, sequin or even pearls and diamonds.