Correspondence José Luis Guerín – Jonas Mekas

  • October 17, 2014 / 20:00
  • October 31, 2014 / 20:00

Spain ,USA, 2009–2011, HDV, DV, color, black & white, 99’
Spanish and English with Turkish subtitles

Dear Jonas, dear José Luis – a cinematic letter exchange in the form of nine short film notes, framed in classic style with a salutation and farewell greeting. Jonas Mekas, the Nestor of the American avant-garde, and Catalonian filmmaker José é Luis Guerín take turns in filming snapshots of their lives from all over the world, taking in driving snow, Ken and Flo Jacobs or pigeons on the street in New York here and reflections on a empty cinema screen and a moving conversation with Slovenian film critic Nika Bohinc there. Filmmaking and their two very different working methods also often form the theme. It is a correspondence between two different temperaments – Guerín’s stylized black and white and formalist will, Mekas’s wild video camera – and yet very much the work of two true pen pals.

Correspondence José Luis Guerín – Jonas Mekas

Correspondence José Luis Guerín – Jonas Mekas

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