Bauhaus: Model and Myth

  • October 17, 2018 / 17:00
  • November 2, 2018 / 19:00

Directors: Niels Bolbrinker, Kerstin Stutterheim
Germany,  2009, 103', color
German with Turkish subtitle
 
Founded in Weimar in 1919, the Bauhaus school, which sought to reconcile the arts and crafts and create a new aesthetic that would serve industry, was undeniably the twentieth century’s most important school of art, design and architecture. Considered today as a reference, the Bauhaus is more than just cubic buildings and steel tube chairs. The faculty included leading artists such as Wassily Kandinsky, Lyonel Feininger, Paul Klee and Oskar Schlemmer, and architects such as Walter Gropius and Mies van der Rohe. The film looks at the post-World War I origins of the Bauhaus and its revolutionary influence. It reveals the real story behind its closing and the political collusion among some of its members under Nazi Germany, based on accounts by alumni and archival excerpts that reveal the visions of some of the school’s former teachers.
 
Free admissions. Drop in, no reservations.
 
 

Bauhaus: Model and Myth

Bauhaus: Model and Myth

Bauhaus: Media Art

Bauhaus: Media Art

Turquerie

Turquerie

Having penetrated the Balkans in the fourteenth century, conquered Constantinople in the fifteenth, and reached the gates of Vienna in the sixteenth, the Ottoman Empire long struck fear into European hearts. 

The Ottoman Way of Serving Coffee

The Ottoman Way of Serving Coffee

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I Copy Therefore I Am

I Copy Therefore I Am

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