Bauhaus: Beyond a School

October 14 - November 2, 2018

In this program presented in the scope of the 4th Istanbul Design Biennial organized by the Istanbul Foundation for Culture and Arts with the theme 
A School of Schools, Pera Film tackles the creative relationship Bauhaus had with different disciplines while focusing on the generative works of artists and architects.
 
This program’s screenings are free of admissions. Drop in, no reservations.
 
 
  in collaboration

#BeyondASchool

 

October 14

18:00 Bauhaus: Media Art

October 17

17:00 Bauhaus: Model and Myth

November 2

19:00 Bauhaus: Model and Myth

21:00 Bauhaus: Media Art

Bauhaus: Model and Myth

Bauhaus: Model and Myth

Bauhaus: Media Art

Bauhaus: Media Art

4th Istanbul Design Biennial

Pera Museum hosted the 4th Istanbul Design Biennial, organized by Istanbul Foundation for Culture and Arts (İKSV). For the 4th Istanbul Design Biennial, organised by the Istanbul Foundation for Culture and Arts (İKSV) and sponsored by VitrA, curator Jan Boelen teamed up with Vera Sacchetti as Associate Curator and Nadine Botha as Assistant Curator.

4th Istanbul Design Biennial

Cindy Sherman Look At Me!

Cindy Sherman Look At Me!

The exhibition Look at Me! Portraits and Other Fictions from the ”la Caixa” Contemporary Art Collection examines portraiture, one of the oldest artistic genres, through a significant number of works of our times. Through the exhibition we will be sharing about the artists and sections in Look At Me!.

Seaside Leisure

Seaside Leisure

Istanbul’s Seaside Leisure: Nostalgia from Sea Baths to Beaches exhibition brought together photographs, magazines, comics, objects, and books from various private and institutional collections, and told a nostalgic story while also addressing the change and socialization of the norms of how Istanbulites used their free time. Istanbul’s Seaside Leisure was a documentary testament of the radical transformations in the Republic’s lifestyle. 

Midnight Stories: COGITO <br> Tevfik Uyar

Midnight Stories: COGITO
Tevfik Uyar

He had imagined the court room as a big place. It wasn’t. It was about the size of his living room, with an elevation at one end, with a dais on it. The judges and the attorneys sat there. Below it was an old wooden rail, worn out in some places. That was his place. There was another seat for his lawyer. At the back, about 20 or 30 chairs were stowed out for the non-existent crowd.