Alternate Endings, Activist Risings

  • December 1, 2018 / 15:00
  • December 5, 2018 / 19:00

VOCAL (Voices Of Community Activists & Leaders), 2018, 7’ 48’’
ACT UP NY, 2018, 8’ 09’’
Positive Women’s Network – USA, 2018, 6’ 31’’
The SPOT (Safe Place Over Time), 2018, 6’ 03’’
Tacoma Action Collective, 2018, 7’ 31’’
Sero Project, 2018, 7’ 24’’ 

Alternate Endings, Activist Risings highlights the impact of art in AIDS activism and advocacy today by commissioning compelling short videos from six inspiring community organizations and collectives—ACT UP NY, Positive Women’s Network, Sero Project, The SPOT, Tacoma Action Collective, and VOCAL NY. The program seeks to reflect the persisting urgencies of today’s HIV/AIDS epidemic by pointing to pressing and intersecting political concerns, including HIV criminalization, Big Pharma, homelessness, and the disproportionate effects of HIV on marginalized communities. At a moment of growing interest in the histories of AIDS activism, Alternate Endings, Activist Risings foregrounds contemporary engagements between activists, artists, and cultural workers on the front lines.

Free admissions. Drop in, no reservations.

Blue

Blue

All About My Mother

All About My Mother

Wild Combination: A Portrait of Arthur Russell

Wild Combination: A Portrait of Arthur Russell

Alternate Endings, Activist Risings

Alternate Endings, Activist Risings

Trailer

Alternate Endings, Activist Risings

I Copy Therefore I Am

I Copy Therefore I Am

Suggesting alternative models for new social and economic systems, SUPERFLEX works appear before us as energy systems, beverages, sculptures, copies, hypnosis sessions, infrastructure, paintings, plant nurseries, contracts, or specifically designed public spaces.

Symbols

Symbols

Pera Museum’s Cold Front from the Balkans exhibition curated by Ali Akay and Alenka Gregorič brings together contemporary artists from Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Kosovo, Macedonia, Montenegro, Romania, Serbia and Slovenia.

The Ottoman Way of Serving Coffee

The Ottoman Way of Serving Coffee

Coffee was served with much splendor at the harems of the Ottoman palace and mansions. First, sweets (usually jam) was served on silverware, followed by coffee serving. The coffee jug would be placed in a sitil (brazier), which had three chains on its sides for carrying, had cinders in the middle, and was made of tombac, silver or brass. The sitil had a satin or silk cover embroidered with silver thread, tinsel, sequin or even pearls and diamonds.