Osman Hamdi Bey and the Americans

Archaeology | Diplomacy | Art

October 15, 2011 - January 8, 2012

Based on the intersecting lives of painter, archaeologist and museologist Osman Hamdi Bey, American archaeologist and photographer John Henry Haynes, as well as Prof. Hermann Vollrath Hilprech, the exhibition focused on the first excavations American archaeologists conducted in Ottoman lands -Assos and Nippur- and the diplomatic relations between the two countries.

The exhibition, curated by Prof. Renata Holod and Prof. Robert Ousterhout from the University of Pennsylvania, showcased for the first time a rich selection of paintings by Osman Hamdi Bey, archaeological photographs and drawings from the 19th century, letters, travel journals, and archaeological artifacts. This unique selection was on loan from the University of Pennsylvania, Fine Arts Museum Boston, İstanbul Archaeological Museums, İstanbul Museum of Painting and Sculpture, as well as private collections. Apart from his lesser-known paintings, two unknown works of Osman Hamdi Bey discovered at the Penn Museum were also introduced to visitors.

Exhibition Catalogue

Osman Hamdi Bey and the Americans

Osman Hamdi Bey and the Americans

Based on the intersecting lives of painter, archaeologist, and museologist Osman Hamdi Bey, American archaeologist and photographer John Henry Haynes, as well as Prof. Hermann Vollrath Hilprecht,...

Video

Cameria (Mihrimah Sultan)

Cameria (Mihrimah Sultan)

Based on similar examples by the European painters in various collections, this work is one of the portraits of Mihrimah Sultan, who was depicted rather often in the 16th century.

Istanbul-Paris-Istanbul: Mario Prassinos

Istanbul-Paris-Istanbul: Mario Prassinos

Mario Prassinos liked Istanbul more than the current Istanbulites of today. It is obvious that you can understand this from the article written by her daughter Catherine Prassinos in the Pera Museum's book on the artist.

Andy Warhol’s Screen Tests

Andy Warhol’s Screen Tests

Between 1963 and 1966 Andy Warhol worked at making film portraits of all sorts of characters linked to New York art circles. Famous people and anonymous people were filmed by Andy Warhol’s 16 mm camera, for almost four minutes, without any instructions other than ‘to get in front of the camera’.