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Mehmed The Hunter’s Imperial Procession

Paintings commissioned by the 17th century Swedish Ambassador Claes Rålamb

June 1 - October 1, 2006

Sultan Mehmed IV, remembered as Mehmed the Hunter owing to his passion for hunting, departed for Edirne, in 1657 on a hunting expedition. The large entourage that accompanied him was a display of imperial majesty that has been preserved for history as a visual document in the form of a series of oil paintings commissioned by Claes Rålamb, then the Swedish Ambassador to Istanbul.

This almost cinematographic record consisting of a total of twenty paintings is preserved at the Nordiska Museet, Sweden. Sixteen of the paintings that are part of this visual register returned to Istanbul nearly three hundred and fifty years after this event as the guests of the Pera Museum.

Exhibition Catalogue

Mehmed The Hunter’s Imperial Procession

Mehmed The Hunter’s Imperial Procession

Sultan Mehmed IV, remembered as “Mehmed the Hunter” because of his passion for hunting, departed for Edirne in 1657 on a hunting expedition with a large entourage in a display of imperial majesty...

Introducing… Turkish coffee!

Introducing… Turkish coffee!

Celebrating its 10th anniversary this year, Pera Museum invites artist Benoît Hamet to reinterpret key pieces from its collections, casting a humourous eye over ‘historical’ events, both imagined and factual.

A Photographer’s Biography Guillaume Berggren

A Photographer’s Biography Guillaume Berggren

Berggren acquires the techniques of photography in Berlin and holds different jobs in various European cities before arriving in İstanbul. Initially en route to Marseille, he disembarks from his ship in 1866 and settles in İstanbul, where he is to spend the rest of his life.

Good News from the Skies

Good News from the Skies

Inspired by the exhibition And Now the Good News, which focusing on the relationship between mass media and art, we prepared horoscope readings based on the chapters of the exhibition. Using the popular astrological language inspired by the effects of the movements of celestial bodies on people, these readings with references to the works in the exhibition make fictional future predictions inspired by the horoscope columns that we read in the newspapers with the desire to receive good news about our day.