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Manolo Valdés

Paintings and Sculptures

May 8 - July 21, 2013

A leading figure of Spanish Pop Art, Manolo Valdés was at Pera Museum with a selection of works that extend from the 1980s to the present.

Organized in collaboration of Marlborough Gallery New York, the exhibition was comprised of a selection of the artist’s paintings and sculptures. Renowned particularly for the diversity of his media, his large-scale works, and quests in form, Valdés is hailed as one of the great masters of contemporary Spanish art.

Following the dissolution of Equipo Crónica, the pioneering group of Pop Art in Spain, which he co-founded, Valdés continued his career solo as of 1982. His works derive their strength from the masterpieces of the past, bear historic clues, colors, and textures, and make strong references to art history, carrying traces that extend from Velázquez to Zurbarán, and from Matisse to Picasso and Lichtenstein.

Stripping a painting from its original context and reinterpreting it through Pop Art, the artist primarily focuses on figures, objects, and series.

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Exhibition Catalogue

Manolo Valdés

Manolo Valdés

Manolo Valdés: Paintings and Sculptures exhibition was comprised of a selection of the artist’s paintings and sculptures. Renowned particularly for the diversity of his media, his...

Video

Transition to Sculpture

Transition to Sculpture

If Manolo Valdés’s paintings convey a search for materiality, his sculpture does so even more. Today, sculpture has taken over most of his workspace, his time, and his efforts.

Bruce Nauman Look At Me!

Bruce Nauman Look At Me!

The exhibition Look at Me! Portraits and Other Fictions from the ”la Caixa” Contemporary Art Collection examines portraiture, one of the oldest artistic genres, through a significant number of works of our times. Through the exhibition we will be sharing about the artists and sections in Look At Me!.

It’s better to burn out than to fade away

It’s better to burn out than to fade away

In 1962 Philip Corner, one of the most prominent members of the Fluxus movement, caused a great commotion in serious music circles when during a performance entitled Piano Activities he climbed up onto a grand piano and began to kick it while other members of the group attacked it with saws, hammers and all kinds of other implements.