Hippodrom/ Atmeydanı

A Stage For Istanbul's History

February 16 - April 18, 2010

The Hippodrome was the largest and one of the most significant buildings in Byzantine Constantinople. Located in the heart of the city beside the Great Palace, it was not only an arena for chariot races -the most exciting and popular spectator sport from the 4th to the 7th century- but also a place where emperors were created, military victories celebrated, and rulers collectively acclaimed by the people. Atmeydanı, on the other hand, became one of the most important and lively public spaces of Ottoman İstanbul. “The Hippodrome/Atmeydanı: A Stage For İstanbul’s History” exhibition examined this very special and colorful square of the city, which has also hosted a variety of consequential incidents during the foundation of the Republic, through artefacts, architectural drawings, photographs and daily life objects, and took the İstanbulites on a tour of their city’s different recollection spanning from the 4th to the 20th century.

Exhibition Catalogue

Hippodrom/ Atmeydanı

Hippodrom/ Atmeydanı

The Hippodrome was the largest and one of the most significant buildings in Byzantine Constantinople. Located in the heart of the city beside the Great Palace, it was not only an arena for chariot...

Doublethinking About Big Brother! <br> 11 Quotes from 1984

Doublethinking About Big Brother!
11 Quotes from 1984

Our Doublethink Double vision exhibition’s title alludes to George Orwell’s seminal work 1984 and presents a selection that includes Tracey Emin, Marcel Dzama, Anselm Kiefer, Bruce Nauman, Raymond Pettibon, and Thomas Ruff, as well as Turkish artists, tracing the steps of pluralistic thought through works of art.

Chlebowski’s Sultan

Chlebowski’s Sultan

This is one of Stanisław Chlebowski’s larger canvasses dealing with themes other than battles; only Ottoman Life at the Sweet Waters now at the Istanbul Military Museum can compare with it in size.

Rineke Dijkstra Look At Me!

Rineke Dijkstra Look At Me!

“The portrait tells us that there is an inner and an outer dimension of the human condition; it provides—or should provide—information about both the physical and psychological character of an individual.”