Connecting the Dots

Workshops

August 6 - September 22, 2013

As part of its youth exhibition series held traditionally since its foundation, Pera Museum hosted selected works from the workshops of the 6th International Student Triennial in collaboration with Marmara University Faculty of Fine Arts.

Held in June 2013 in Istanbul, the 6th International Student Triennial was organized to contribute to the communication between institutions of art and design education at graduate level. Exhibitions, symposia, workshops and short film screenings were held within the scope of the triennial that brought together art and design students from around the world as well as theoreticians and researchers from various disciplines.

The exhibition titled Connecting the Dots featured a selection of works from 13 out of 38 workshops.

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Exhibition Catalogue

Connecting the Dots‬

Connecting the Dots‬

Marmara University Faculty of Fine Arts International Student Triennial, that has brought together numerous art and design schools from around 60 different countries in Istanbul since its...

Video

Doublethinking About Big Brother! <br> 11 Quotes from 1984

Doublethinking About Big Brother!
11 Quotes from 1984

Our Doublethink Double vision exhibition’s title alludes to George Orwell’s seminal work 1984 and presents a selection that includes Tracey Emin, Marcel Dzama, Anselm Kiefer, Bruce Nauman, Raymond Pettibon, and Thomas Ruff, as well as Turkish artists, tracing the steps of pluralistic thought through works of art.

A Photographer’s Biography Pascal Sebah

A Photographer’s Biography Pascal Sebah

Following the opening of his studio, “El Chark Societe Photographic,” on Beyoğlu’s Postacılar Caddesi in 1857, the Levantine-descent Pascal Sébah moves to yet another studio next to the Russian Embassy in 1860 with a Frenchman named A. Laroche, who, apart from having worked in Paris previously, is also quite familiar with photographic techniques.

Rineke Dijkstra Look At Me!

Rineke Dijkstra Look At Me!

“The portrait tells us that there is an inner and an outer dimension of the human condition; it provides—or should provide—information about both the physical and psychological character of an individual.”