}

Collage Décollage

Doğançay / Villeglé

May 3 - July 13, 2008

Although from very different origins and cultures, Dogançay (born in Istanbul, Turkey, in 1929) and Villeglé (born in Quimper, France, in 1926) share the same interest in the city. Whereas Dogançay soon felt the need to travel and find out what was happening elsewhere, Villeglé moved to Paris and henceforth participated in the collective “Nouveau Réalisme” adventure. Although Dogançay’s art was originally based primarily on conventional pictorial practices –almost exclusively gouaches and watercolors, standing as a testimony to his numerous journeys– since the mid-1960s he has taken his themes uniquely from images and signs seen on the walls of the cities he has traversed. As of 1949, Villeglé’s art has been based on collecting a world of ready-made “paintings” that are offered to him by “anonymously torn posters” that he saw when exploring the city.

Collage [gluing, pasting] in the first case, décollage [tearing down, unpeeling] in the second: these two practices characterize two sets of attitudes that, if not parallel, converge, and summon up a world of colorful icons founded on the theme of the city or images, absorbed into uncompromisingly abstract compositions. The idea of bringing together two leading artists of their generation in the same exhibition aims to reveal to viewers the similarities, as well as the differences between Dogançay and Villeglé, whose works anticipate, in their own way, the arrival of “graffiti” art as part of the same aesthetic impulse.

Curator: Philippe Piguet

Exhibition Catalogue

Collage Décollage

Collage Décollage

Although from very different origins and cultures, Doğançay (born in Istanbul, Turkey, in 1929) and Villeglé (born in Quimper, France, in 1926) share the same interest in the city. Whereas the...

The Ottoman Way of Serving Coffee

The Ottoman Way of Serving Coffee

Coffee was served with much splendor at the harems of the Ottoman palace and mansions. First, sweets (usually jam) was served on silverware, followed by coffee serving. The coffee jug would be placed in a sitil (brazier), which had three chains on its sides for carrying, had cinders in the middle, and was made of tombac, silver or brass. The sitil had a satin or silk cover embroidered with silver thread, tinsel, sequin or even pearls and diamonds.

Midnight Horror Stories: The Last Ferry <br> Galip Dursun

Midnight Horror Stories: The Last Ferry
Galip Dursun

I remembered a game as I was waiting in the passenger lounge for the ferry to arrive just a few minutes ago. A game we used to play at home when I was young, in my country that is very far away from here, a relic from the distant past; I don’t even remember how we used to play it. The kind of game that makes me feel a thousand times lonelier than I already am among the crowd waiting to get on the ferry.

The Rat Tribe Sim Chi Yin

The Rat Tribe Sim Chi Yin

Pera Museum, in collaboration with Istanbul Foundation for Culture and Arts (İKSV), is one of the main venues for this year’s 15th Istanbul Biennial from 16 September to 12 November 2017.