Orientalism in Polish Art

October 24, 2014 - January 18, 2015

The exhibition highlighted the orientalist trend in Polish painting, as well as drawings and graphic arts. The works in the exhibition covered a wide period from the 17th to the early 19th centuries. Among others, the exhibition included drawings by Christian Kamsetzer of his Turkish travels, as well as oriental scenes by artists like Żmurko and Brandt. The artworks exemplify topics related to the Ottoman world, and to a lesser extent, the Near East and North African regions.

One section of the exhibition was dedicated to Stanisław Chlebowski, the court artist of Sultan Abdülaziz.  Works by other artists who had visited Turkey, among them Jan Matejko, Wacław Pawliszak, Jan Ciągliński, and Jacek Malczewski, were also included.

Selected from the collections of Polish institutions ranging from the National Museums in Warsaw, Kraków, Poznań, and Wrocław, the University Library in Warsaw, to Łazienki Palace Museum, the exhibition brought together approximately 190 works.

The exhibition was organized as part of the 2014 cultural program, celebrating the 600th anniversary of Polish-Turkish diplomatic relations.

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Exhibition Catalogue

Orientalism in Polish Art

Orientalism in Polish Art

Orientalism, which refers to a cultural current in Europe centered on an interest in the cultures of the East, manifests itself in art, architecture, music, literature, and the theatre. It sprang...

New Sounds from Poland: Paula & Karol

New Sounds from Poland: Paula & Karol

Paula and Karol are a Warsaw-based band who have been capturing the hearts of young and old alike, across Poland and abroad.

SzaZa Plays Polanski<br/>New Sounds from Poland

SzaZa Plays Polanski
New Sounds from Poland

Pera Film hosts Polish duo SzaZa for a special concert, held in paralel to the film program Roman Polanski: Wanted and Desired.

New Sounds from Poland: Małe Instrumenty

New Sounds from Poland: Małe Instrumenty

Founded by Pawel Romanczuk in 2006, Małe Instrumenty (Small Instruments) are a band exploring new sounds using a wide array of small instruments. 

Orientalism in Polish Art

Orientalism in Polish Art

As a result of its geographical location, Poland has always been in close contact with Eastern cultures. Coupled with the Orientalist tendencies of the 19th century, this cultural interaction has led to original outcomes in various fields of art and life. The "Orientalism in Polish Art" Symposium aims to examine these outcomes.

Video

Young at Heart
From Poland with Love

Young at Heart: From Poland with Love program presents a selection of films representing works by the new, young and talented Polish film directors. The common theme of this selection mostly concerns the cultural clash of the value of systems: Catholicism vs. atheism, idealism in contrast with cynicism, and solidarity vs. the wild capitalism.

Orientalism in Polish Cinema

Polish cinema until recently generally ignored Middle Eastern and East Asian cultures on the screen. Recent events related to the Middle-Eastern movements have changed this perspective. As part of this program, three different biographical films present a fresh look into the notion of the East.

The Battle of Varna

The Battle of Varna

Over the years of 1864 through 1876, Stanisław Chlebowski served Sultan Abdülaziz in Istanbul as his court painter. As it was, Abdülaziz disposed of considerable artistic talents of his own, and he actively involved himself in Chlebowski’s creative process, suggesting ideas for compositions –such as ballistic pieces praising the victories of Turkish arms. 

The Captive Sultan

The Captive Sultan

The war fought by the Greeks to shake off the Turkish yoke was closely observed around Europe and, this being the era of romanticism, the events taking place around Greece between 1821 and 1832 became a symbol for national liberation struggle.

Return from Vienna

Return from Vienna

Józef Brandt harboured a fascination for the history of 17th century Poland, and his favourite themes included ballistic scenes and genre scenes before and after the battle proper –all and sundry marches, returns, supply trains, billets and encampments, patrols, and similar motifs illustrating the drudgery of warfare outside of its culminating moments.