I Shot My Love

  • November 22, 2019 / 19:00
  • November 29, 2019 / 19:00

Director: Tomer Heymann
Israel, 2010, 56', HDD, color
Hebrew, English, German with Turkish subtitles

Tomer Heymann comes to the country of his ancestors to present his film Paper Dolls at the Berlin International Film Festival, and there meets a man who will change his life. This 48-hour love affair, originating in Berghain Panorama Bar, develops into a significant relationship between Tomer and Andreas Merk, a German dancer. When Andreas decides to move to Tel-Aviv, he not only has to cope with a new partner, but to manage the complex realities of life in Israel and his personal connection to it as a German citizen. Tomer’s mother, descendent of German immigrants was born and lived all her life in a small Israeli village, where she raised five sons. One by one, she watches her children leave the country she and her family helped to build, and now cannot help but try to influence the life of Tomer, the one son who remains.

It Kinda Scares Me

It Kinda Scares Me

Paper Dolls

Paper Dolls

I Shot My Love

I Shot My Love

The Queen Has No Crown

The Queen Has No Crown

Mr. Gaga

Mr. Gaga

Who's Gonna Love Me Now?

Who's Gonna Love Me Now?

Trailer

I Shot My Love

Between Impressionism and Orientalism

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