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Manolo Valdés

Paintings and Sculptures

May 8 - July 21, 2013

A leading figure of Spanish Pop Art, Manolo Valdés was at Pera Museum with a selection of works that extend from the 1980s to the present.

Organized in collaboration of Marlborough Gallery New York, the exhibition was comprised of a selection of the artist’s paintings and sculptures. Renowned particularly for the diversity of his media, his large-scale works, and quests in form, Valdés is hailed as one of the great masters of contemporary Spanish art.

Following the dissolution of Equipo Crónica, the pioneering group of Pop Art in Spain, which he co-founded, Valdés continued his career solo as of 1982. His works derive their strength from the masterpieces of the past, bear historic clues, colors, and textures, and make strong references to art history, carrying traces that extend from Velázquez to Zurbarán, and from Matisse to Picasso and Lichtenstein.

Stripping a painting from its original context and reinterpreting it through Pop Art, the artist primarily focuses on figures, objects, and series.

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Exhibition Catalogue

Manolo Valdés

Manolo Valdés

Manolo Valdés: Paintings and Sculptures exhibition was comprised of a selection of the artist’s paintings and sculptures. Renowned particularly for the diversity of his media, his...

Video

Transition to Sculpture

Transition to Sculpture

If Manolo Valdés’s paintings convey a search for materiality, his sculpture does so even more. Today, sculpture has taken over most of his workspace, his time, and his efforts.

Turquerie

Turquerie

Having penetrated the Balkans in the fourteenth century, conquered Constantinople in the fifteenth, and reached the gates of Vienna in the sixteenth, the Ottoman Empire long struck fear into European hearts. 

Midnight Horror Stories: The Last Ferry <br> Galip Dursun

Midnight Horror Stories: The Last Ferry
Galip Dursun

I remembered a game as I was waiting in the passenger lounge for the ferry to arrive just a few minutes ago. A game we used to play at home when I was young, in my country that is very far away from here, a relic from the distant past; I don’t even remember how we used to play it. The kind of game that makes me feel a thousand times lonelier than I already am among the crowd waiting to get on the ferry.