Çelenk Bafra
School Square Garden

Curators' Tour

September 18, 2018 / 19:00

Join us for a guided tour of the School Square Garden exhibition with the curator Çelenk Bafra. The tour will offer a unique insight to the works of the exhibition.

Pera Museum presents a contemporary exhibition exploring the multi-layered architectural, art-historical and sociological significance of the Galatasaray High School on the occasion of its 150th anniversary. The exhibition curated by Çelenk Bafra takes on the name of “school” (“mektep”) in reference to the name of the institution still remembered as and called “the school” by its graduates even today, to the deep-rooted history of the building and its character as a place of education.

The tour will be in Turkish.
Admission: 30 TL  (Free for Friends of the Museum) 
Tickets can be purchased on Biletix. Or to book please e-mail: resepsiyon@peramuzesi.org.tr
Places are limited. 
 

Temporary Exhibition

School Square
Galatasaray

Pera Museum presented a contemporary exhibition exploring the multi-layered architectural, art-historical and sociological significance of the Galatasaray High School on the occasion of its 150th anniversary. 

School Square<br> Galatasaray

Bosphorus at the Orientalist Paintings

Bosphorus at the Orientalist Paintings

The Bosphorus, which divides the city from north to south, separates two continents, renders Istanbul distinct for western painters, offers the most picturesque spectacles for western artists.

Venuses Throughout History

Venuses Throughout History

José Sancho does not conceal the voluptuousness of his female torsos; he highlights it. These torsos are symmetrical from front, but on the other hand, from the side, the juxtaposition of concave and convex forms creates dynamism.

The Ottoman Way of Serving Coffee

The Ottoman Way of Serving Coffee

Coffee was served with much splendor at the harems of the Ottoman palace and mansions. First, sweets (usually jam) was served on silverware, followed by coffee serving. The coffee jug would be placed in a sitil (brazier), which had three chains on its sides for carrying, had cinders in the middle, and was made of tombac, silver or brass. The sitil had a satin or silk cover embroidered with silver thread, tinsel, sequin or even pearls and diamonds.