New York after Paris

05 April 2016

Pera Museum is proud to present an exhibition of Giorgio de Chirico, a pioneer of the metaphysical art movement and one of the most extraordinary artists of the 20th century. This part of Giorgio de Chirico: The Enigma of the World exhibition, called “New Themes and Classical Painting Technique (1930-1940)” illustrates de Chirico’s departure from Paris to move to New York. 

Still Life with Knife, 1932, oil on canvas, 80 x 140 cm, Fondazione Giorgio e Isa de Chirico Collection, Rome

New Themes and Classical Painting Technique (1930-1940)

De Chirico’s heydays in Paris came to a dramatic end once the Great Depression wave of economic hardship arrived upon European shores. The Parisian art market and its seemingly incessant thirst for contemporary art at high prices all but dried up overnight. The subject-matter of the mid to late 1920s became difficult to sell, and de Chirico, encouraged by his newfound companion Isabella Pakszwer, began to look to the great masters with renewed vigour once again, with more traditional subjects and painting techniques returning to his artistic production. In search of more fertile terrain, de Chirico spent 1936-1937 living in New York. After several difficult years selling his work in Europe, the artist soon enjoyed the benefits of the favourable American art market. His return to Europe alternated in periods spent in Italy and Paris, owing to de Chirico’s disgust of the Fascist regime and their propagation of race laws. 

The Turk, 1935, oil on canvas, 36,5 x 46 cm, Fondazione Giorgio e Isa de Chirico Collection, Rome

Seascape near Genova, 1933, oil on canvas, 53 x 65 cm, Fondazione Giorgio e Isa de Chirico Collection, Rome 

Highlighting his various periods with examples from his earliest works to last ones, Giorgio de Chirico: The Enigma of the World exhibition took place at the Pera Museum between 24 February - 08 May 2016.

Rineke Dijkstra Look At Me!

Rineke Dijkstra Look At Me!

“The portrait tells us that there is an inner and an outer dimension of the human condition; it provides—or should provide—information about both the physical and psychological character of an individual.” 

Girl in a Blue Dress

Girl in a Blue Dress

This life-size portrait of a girl is a fine example of the British art of portrait painting in the early 18th century. The child is shown posing on a terrace, which is enclosed at the right foreground by the plinth of a pillar; the background is mainly filled with trees and shrubs. 

Story of José Sancho’s Life

Story of José Sancho’s Life

He was born on April 18, 1935 in the province of Puntarenas, Costa Rica. His family migrated to the capital, San José, where in 1952 he earned a bachelor’s degree from the Lyceum of Costa Rica.