Correspondence Albert Serra – Lisandro Alonso

  • October 18, 2014 / 14:00
  • October 24, 2014 / 19:00

Spain, Argentina, 2011, DV, 16 mm, color, 169’
Spanish and English with Turkish subtitles

Both Catalan Albert Serra and Argentinean Lisandro Alonso are two of the most idiosyncratic formal innovators in cinema. With just one film each, both of which refer to a previous work, they each reflect upon their respective forms of filmmaking without directly addressing the other. In the two and a half hour The Lord Worked Wonders In Me, Serra brings the actors from Honor de cavallería and his team of staff to La Mancha to follow in the footsteps of Don Quixote. There is a lot of debate, eating and waiting around. For Untitled (Letter For Serra), Alonso returns to the province of La Pampa to accompany the woodcutter protagonist from his film La libertad once again – a short film without words until the end, when the plot of a future film project is then read out.

Correspondence José Luis Guerín – Jonas Mekas

Correspondence José Luis Guerín – Jonas Mekas

Correspondence Jaime Rosales – Wang Bing

Correspondence Jaime Rosales – Wang Bing

Correspondence Isaki Lacuesta – Naomi Kawase

Correspondence Isaki Lacuesta – Naomi Kawase

Correspondence Fernando Eimbcke – So Yong Kim

Correspondence Fernando Eimbcke – So Yong Kim

Correspondence Albert Serra – Lisandro Alonso

Correspondence Albert Serra – Lisandro Alonso

Los Caprichos

Los Caprichos

It can be seen how Goya gradually and constantly investigated all the technical possibilities of creative engraving from etching to lithography. 

The Battle of Varna

The Battle of Varna

Over the years of 1864 through 1876, Stanisław Chlebowski served Sultan Abdülaziz in Istanbul as his court painter. As it was, Abdülaziz disposed of considerable artistic talents of his own, and he actively involved himself in Chlebowski’s creative process, suggesting ideas for compositions –such as ballistic pieces praising the victories of Turkish arms. 

Turquerie

Turquerie

Having penetrated the Balkans in the fourteenth century, conquered Constantinople in the fifteenth, and reached the gates of Vienna in the sixteenth, the Ottoman Empire long struck fear into European hearts.