Create Your Magic Fruit

Pera Kids
Ages 4-6

Do you know how coffee is grown before it is turned into a beverage and enters our homes? Do you have any guesses? Do you think it is a fruit or a vegetable, or some kind of snack? Coffee is a fruit, and like other fruits, it grows on trees! The fruit of the coffee tree is actually red at first, and it turns into the familiar brown seed after it is roasted.

Coffee was first discovered by Ethiopians who live in Africa, who realized that they could brew it into a delightful beverage. They called this plant the Magic Fruit. If you had a magic fruit, what would it look like? Can you draw it? Use color pens to draw a picture of your magic fruit on paper, and share with everyone what its magical properties would be! Don’t forget to use the #PeraLearning hashtag on social media… 

Related Exhibition: Coffee Break

Illustrator: İpek Kay
Game Writer: 
Neray Çeşme

This program is presented especially for the 100th anniversary of the April 23 National Sovereignty and Children’s Day, inspired by Pera Museum's digital exhibitions.

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