Create Your Magic Fruit

Pera Kids
Ages 4-6

Do you know how coffee is grown before it is turned into a beverage and enters our homes? Do you have any guesses? Do you think it is a fruit or a vegetable, or some kind of snack? Coffee is a fruit, and like other fruits, it grows on trees! The fruit of the coffee tree is actually red at first, and it turns into the familiar brown seed after it is roasted.

Coffee was first discovered by Ethiopians who live in Africa, who realized that they could brew it into a delightful beverage. They called this plant the Magic Fruit. If you had a magic fruit, what would it look like? Can you draw it? Use color pens to draw a picture of your magic fruit on paper, and share with everyone what its magical properties would be! Don’t forget to use the #PeraLearning hashtag on social media… 

Related Exhibition: Coffee Break

Illustrator: İpek Kay
Game Writer: 
Neray Çeşme

This program is presented especially for the 100th anniversary of the April 23 National Sovereignty and Children’s Day, inspired by Pera Museum's digital exhibitions.

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Portrait of Martín Zapater (1797)

Portrait of Martín Zapater (1797)

Martín Zapater y Clavería, born in Zaragoza on November 12th 1747, came from a family of modest merchants and was taken in to live with a well-to-do aunt, Juana Faguás, and her daughter, Joaquina de Alduy. He studied with Goya in the Escuelas Pías school in Zaragoza from 1752 to 1757 and a friendship arose between them which was to last until the death of Zapater in 1803. 

An Ottoman Ambassador and a French Bulldog at Covent Garden

An Ottoman Ambassador and a French Bulldog at Covent Garden

Celebrating its 10th anniversary this year, Pera Museum invites artist Benoît Hamet to reinterpret key pieces from its collections, casting a humourous eye over ‘historical’ events, both imagined and factual.

Introducing… Turkish coffee!

Introducing… Turkish coffee!

Celebrating its 10th anniversary this year, Pera Museum invites artist Benoît Hamet to reinterpret key pieces from its collections, casting a humourous eye over ‘historical’ events, both imagined and factual.