}

Present Times

Anadolu University Faculty of Fine Arts

July 20 - October 2, 2011

Since its inauguration, Pera Museum has been instrumental in promoting young artists and institutions of art education by opening its exhibition halls during the summer months. In 2011, the Museum hosted Anadolu University's Faculty of Fine Arts.

Entitled Present Times, the exhibition was comprised of selected works by young artists and designers enrolled in a wide range of departments at the Faculty. While offering students the opportunity to experiment with the art education of their respective departments, the exhibition also strived to establish itself as a groundwork for problems of contemporary art and design, innovative tendencies, and idiosyncratic identities through a abundance of self-expression possibilities such as painting, printmaking, sculpture, ceramics, installation, interior design, graphic design, photography, digital art, glass, and video.

Exhibition Catalogue

Present Times

Present Times

Present Times: Anadolu University Faculty of Fine Arts exhibition catalogue is comprised of selected works by young artists and designers enrolled in a wide range of departments at the...

Video

Baby King

Baby King

1638, the year Louis XIV was born –his second name, Dieudonné, alluding to his God-given status– saw the diffusion of a cult of maternity encouraged by the very devout Anne of Austria, in thanks for the miracle by which she had given birth to an heir to the French throne. Simon François de Tours (1606-1671) painted the Queen in the guise of the Virgin Mary, and the young Louis XIV as the infant Jesus, in the allegorical portrait now in the Bishop’s Palace at Sens.

At The Well

At The Well

Tadeusz Ajdukiewicz discovered the Orient in 1877, touring Syria, Egypt, Turkey, and the Crimea with Władysław Branicki. This experience made a profound impression on him, and he was to continuously revisit Eastern themes in his works for the rest of his life. 

Medicinal Herbs in Byzantium

Medicinal Herbs in Byzantium

Knowledge of plants and the practice of healing are closely entwined. The toxic or hallucinogenic nature of some roots, and the dangers associated with picking them, conferred a mythical or magical character and power.