}

BYOB (Bring Your Own Beamer)

September 27, 2014

Pera Museum presented “BYOB (Bring Your Own Beamer)”, a one-night exhibition hosting artists and their projectors. The artists participating in this event bring their own projectors and show their video works. Since 2010, BYOB (Bring Your Own Beamer) has been organized in many different cities around the world. Put together by Pera Museum’s Film and Video Program curator Fatma Çolakoğlu and project assistant Ulya Soley, the broad and diverse selection presents a look into the audio-visual creative tendencies in moving images by up-and-coming artists. Hence, the selection aspires to embrace the lesser-known gems of the experimental and avant-garde. On this evening these imaginative works collided into one another, joining together to beam an inspired, fresh bloom.

Artists: Yoel Meranda, Eytan İpeker, Volkan Şenozan, Serkan Ertekin, Deniz Tortum, Burak Çevik, Aylin Güngör, Can Eskinazi, Bengü Özakıncı, Serra Tansel.

This event was presented parallel to Moving Image İstanbul, which will feature a selection of international commercial galleries and non-profit institutions presenting single-channel videos, single-channel projections, video sculptures, and other larger video installations.

Portrait of Martín Zapater (1797)

Portrait of Martín Zapater (1797)

Martín Zapater y Clavería, born in Zaragoza on November 12th 1747, came from a family of modest merchants and was taken in to live with a well-to-do aunt, Juana Faguás, and her daughter, Joaquina de Alduy. He studied with Goya in the Escuelas Pías school in Zaragoza from 1752 to 1757 and a friendship arose between them which was to last until the death of Zapater in 1803. 

Face to Face

Face to Face

A firm believer in the idea that a collection needs to be upheld at least by four generations and comparing this continuity to a relay race, Nahit Kabakcı began creating the Huma Kabakcı Collection from the 1980s onwards. 

Andy Warhol’s Screen Tests

Andy Warhol’s Screen Tests

Between 1963 and 1966 Andy Warhol worked at making film portraits of all sorts of characters linked to New York art circles. Famous people and anonymous people were filmed by Andy Warhol’s 16 mm camera, for almost four minutes, without any instructions other than ‘to get in front of the camera’.