Anatolian Weights and Measures

Anatolian Weights and Measures Collection is one of the three main collection fields of Suna and Inan Kıraç Foundation. The collection includes all the foremost weights and measurement instruments used in Anatolia for nearly four thousand years since the second millennium BC, and is regarded as one on the leading collections of the field. Among the objects of the collection are weighing and measuring tools used in a variety of fields ranging from land measurement to commerce, and by various professionals including architects, moneychangers, mariners and pharmacists. The collection is a scientific resource that illustrates the systematic relations between periods and cultures, as well as transformations and continuities.

A broad selection from the collection is exhibited in chronological order, shedding light on this exciting aspect of the history of science and culture in Anatolia and offering a fresh look at the long history of commercial practices based on weights and measures used.

3D Virtual Tour

Exhibition Catalogue

Anatolian Weights and Measures

Anatolian Weights and Measures

The Anatolian weights and measures collection is comprised of over ten thousand pieces and is now one of the most remarkable collections of its kind in Turkey.

Video

The adventure of the Big ‘K’

The adventure of the Big ‘K’

In a bid to review the International System of Units (SI), the International Bureau of Weights and Measures gathered at the 26th General Conference on Weights and Measures on November 16, 2018. Sixty member states have voted for changing four out of seven basic units of measurement. The kilogram is among the modified. Before describing the key points, let us have a closer look into the kilogram and its history.

Unhomely!  <br>Lee Miller

Unhomely!
Lee Miller

Pera Museum, in collaboration with Istanbul Foundation for Culture and Arts (İKSV), is one of the main venues for this year’s 15th Istanbul Biennial from 16 September to 12 November 2017.

Baby King

Baby King

1638, the year Louis XIV was born –his second name, Dieudonné, alluding to his God-given status– saw the diffusion of a cult of maternity encouraged by the very devout Anne of Austria, in thanks for the miracle by which she had given birth to an heir to the French throne. Simon François de Tours (1606-1671) painted the Queen in the guise of the Virgin Mary, and the young Louis XIV as the infant Jesus, in the allegorical portrait now in the Bishop’s Palace at Sens.