Nikita Alexeev

Artist’s talk

July 18, 2017 / 18:30

Join artist Nikita Alexeevfor a talk with curator Alistair Hicks, in relation to Pera Museum’s Doublethink: Double Vision exhibition. The talk will focus on Alexeev’s work “Iconostasis Tie”, which he produced specifically for the exhibition, and will also open a platform to discuss Moscow Conceptualism, a term that constitute the backbone of the exhibition. 

The talk is free of admissions. Space is limited, drop in.

Temporary Exhibition

Doublethink
Double vision

Thinking has changed radically, but many people don't appear to have noticed. Our institutions have been stuck on linear Neo-Platonic tracks for 24 centuries. These antiquated processes of deduction have lost their authority. Just like art it has fallen off its pedestal. Legal, educational and constitutional systems rigidly subscribe to these; they are 100% text based.

Doublethink <br>Double vision

Cindy Sherman Look At Me!

Cindy Sherman Look At Me!

The exhibition Look at Me! Portraits and Other Fictions from the ”la Caixa” Contemporary Art Collection examines portraiture, one of the oldest artistic genres, through a significant number of works of our times. Through the exhibition we will be sharing about the artists and sections in Look At Me!.

Portrait of Martín Zapater (1797)

Portrait of Martín Zapater (1797)

Martín Zapater y Clavería, born in Zaragoza on November 12th 1747, came from a family of modest merchants and was taken in to live with a well-to-do aunt, Juana Faguás, and her daughter, Joaquina de Alduy. He studied with Goya in the Escuelas Pías school in Zaragoza from 1752 to 1757 and a friendship arose between them which was to last until the death of Zapater in 1803. 

Return from Vienna

Return from Vienna

Józef Brandt harboured a fascination for the history of 17th century Poland, and his favourite themes included ballistic scenes and genre scenes before and after the battle proper –all and sundry marches, returns, supply trains, billets and encampments, patrols, and similar motifs illustrating the drudgery of warfare outside of its culminating moments.