“Excavating the Future”
Bahia Shehab

Artist Talk

June 9, 2016

Artist Bahia Shehab will give a talk titled “Excavating the Future.” This event is presented in conjunction to the Jameel Prize 4 exhibition organised by the Victoria and Albert Museum, London in partnership with Art Jameel, and in collaboration with the Pera Museum.

About Bahia Shehab
Bahia Shehab is a Lebanese-Egyptian artist, designer and art historian. She is associate professor of design, director of the visual cultures program and founder of the graphic design program at The American University in Cairo. Her artwork has been on display in exhibitions, galleries and streets in Canada, China, Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, Lebanon, Morocco, UAE and the US. The documentary Nefertiti's Daughters featuring her street artwork during the Egyptian uprising was released in 2015. Her book "A Thousand Times NO: The Visual History of Lam-Alif" was published in 2010 and the artwork by the same title is on the shortlist for the V&A’s Jameel Prize for 2016. She is a 2012 TED Fellow and a 2016 TED Senior Fellow. Bahia was selected as one of BBC’s 100 Women for two consecutive years, in 2013 and 2014.

Free of admissions, drop in.
The talk will be in English with simultaneous translation to Turkish.

In partnership with

Jameel Prize 4

Jameel Prize 4 exhibition in Istanbul organized by the Victoria and Albert Museum, London in partnership with Art Jameel, and in collaboration with the Pera Museum.

Jameel Prize 4

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