Aida Abadžić Hodžić & Edward Lucie-Smith

Talk

February 16, 2017 / 18:30

As part of the exhibition Mersad Berber: An Allegory of BosniaAida Abadžić Hodžić, the exhibition’s curator and art critic Edward Lucie-Smith, one of the leading art historians in Bosnia and Herzegovina, will be in conversation. Edward Lucie-Smith, the author of iconic books such as Art Today and Visual Arts in the Twentieth Century, maintains that Mersad Berber’s vast body of expressive and unique works triggered the local art scene’s recognition into Europe as well as the international stage.

Free of admissions, drop in. This event will take place in the auditorium. The talk will be in English with simultaneous Turkish translation.

Temporary Exhibition

Mersad Berber

Mersad Berber (1940 – 2012) is one of the greatest and most significant representatives of Bosnian–Herzegovinian art from the second half of the 20th century. His vast body of expressive and unique works triggered the local art scene’s recognition into Europe as well as the international stage.

Mersad Berber

It’s better to burn out than to fade away

It’s better to burn out than to fade away

In 1962 Philip Corner, one of the most prominent members of the Fluxus movement, caused a great commotion in serious music circles when during a performance entitled Piano Activities he climbed up onto a grand piano and began to kick it while other members of the group attacked it with saws, hammers and all kinds of other implements.

A Solitary Eagle in the Sinai Desert

A Solitary Eagle in the Sinai Desert

John Frederick Lewis is considered one of the most important British Orientalist artists of the Victorian era. Pera Museum exhibited several of Lewis’ paintings as part of the Lure of the East exhibition in 2008 organized in collaboration with Tate Britain.

Midnight Horror Stories: The Last Ferry <br> Galip Dursun

Midnight Horror Stories: The Last Ferry
Galip Dursun

I remembered a game as I was waiting in the passenger lounge for the ferry to arrive just a few minutes ago. A game we used to play at home when I was young, in my country that is very far away from here, a relic from the distant past; I don’t even remember how we used to play it. The kind of game that makes me feel a thousand times lonelier than I already am among the crowd waiting to get on the ferry.