De Chirico’s Sculptures

Pera Museum is proud to present an exhibition of Giorgio de Chirico, a pioneer of the metaphysical art movement and one of the most extraordinary artists of the 20th century. Brought to life in collaboration with the Fondazione Giorgio e Isa de Chirico in Rome, the exhibition comprises a broad selection of 70 paintings, 2 lithography series, and 10 sculptures. Take a look at the fascinating sculptures from the exhibition! 

Orpheus, 1970, gold patinated bronze, 45 x 19 x 22,5 cm. Fondazione Giorgio e Isa de Chirico Collection, Rome 

De Chirico’s working relationship with sculpture occurred relatively late in his career. It was in 1940, at the age of 52, and in the midst of World War II, that he started to produce terracotta sculptures of choice protagonists of his artistic repertoire, including Ariadne, Rider on his Horse, and The Archaeologists. 

The Archaeologists, 1940, Polychrome terracotta, 28 x 22 x 23 cm. Fondazione Giorgio e Isa de Chirico Collection, Rome 

For the artist, “If a sculpture is hard, it is not sculpture. Sculpture must be soft and warm; as such, it will not only have all of painting’s softness, but all of its colour too. A beautiful sculpture is always painterly”. 

The Sibyls, 1970, gold patinated bronze, 54 x 18 x 38,5 cm. Fondazione Giorgio e Isa de Chirico Collection, Rome 

De Chirico manages to make them appear more real, breathing life, with almost Pygmalionesque skill, into their inanimate terracotta bodies. These initial dealings with sculpture were short-lived and it was not until 1968, at the age of 80, that he took sculpture up again, choosing to cast his earlier terracotta works into bronze as well as expand his sculptural repertoire with figures like The Consoler and Hector and Andromache

The Consoler, 1970,
Silver patinated bronze, 34 x 19 x 19,5 cm.
Fondazione Giorgio e Isa de Chirico Collection, Rome 

Highlighting his various periods with examples from his earliest works to last ones, Giorgio de Chirico: The Enigma of the World exhibition took place at the Pera Museum between 24 February - 08 May 2016.

Baby King

Baby King

1638, the year Louis XIV was born –his second name, Dieudonné, alluding to his God-given status– saw the diffusion of a cult of maternity encouraged by the very devout Anne of Austria, in thanks for the miracle by which she had given birth to an heir to the French throne. Simon François de Tours (1606-1671) painted the Queen in the guise of the Virgin Mary, and the young Louis XIV as the infant Jesus, in the allegorical portrait now in the Bishop’s Palace at Sens.

Midnight Stories: The Red Button

Midnight Stories: The Red Button

Pera Museum Blog is launching a new series of “Techno- Dystopia” stories in collaboration with Turkey’s Fantasy and Science Fiction Arts Association (FABISAD). The Association’s member writers are presenting newly commissioned short stories inspired by the artworks of Katherine Behar as part of the Museum’s Data’s Entry exhibition.

The Golden Horn

The Golden Horn

When regarding the paintings of Istanbul by western painters, Golden Horn has a distinctive place and value. This body of water that separates the Topkapı Palace and the Historical Peninsula, in which monumental edifices are located, from Galata, where westerners and foreign embassies dwell, is as though an interpenetrating boundary.